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in the united states to strike a deal to prevent the economy from going over the so- called fiscal cliff. that is when a package of automatic spending cuts and tax rises comes into fact which could set the country back into recession. that less than 20 hours into the generate the first deadline. >> as night descended on washington, no deal precentors went home with a low over 24 hours to go before the huge austerity package known as the fiscal cliff, something almost nobody wants is due to descend on the american economy. >> we will come in at 11:00 tomorrow morning and that further announcements. >> if there's no doubt, the price of failure could be high. the average american, might see their taxes rise by as much as $2,000 a year. as spending cuts take money from the economy, a second american recession becomes a possibility. confidence in america will be shaken. the financial markets may take fright. president obama believes it is time for the wealthiest americans to pay more in taxes. he has made that part of his negotiating position. he criticized republicans for resisting these tax
if the economy goes over the fiscal cliff even the fed itself does not have you have enough tools to go over against the impact. in terms of lack of investment and in terms of businesses closing their doors and remaining sidelined still for quarters going into 2013. adam: well, lindsey, you again are an economist. which is worse, the spending cut from the sequestration or the tax increase? which hits us, 310 million of us are american citizens. which hits us worse? >> well generally when we talk about the difference between spending cuts or tax increases you have to think of taxes as having 1 1/2 times the impact because what that does, there is a trickle down, in fact. we pull out the dollars from investment that would otherwise go to growing businesses investing in equipment, capital and additional employees. right now that is the biggest impact we're not seeing businesses expand and absorbing out that additional labor supply sitting stagnant on the market right now. that is the biggest implication. that is not what we're going to see. adam: james, if i'm hearing her correctly the tax incr
of the economy, america would face higher unemployment and probably effect of recession. >> the fiscal cliff is a series of spending cuts and tax rises. the uncertainty is already hurting the economy here and americans are angry. >> there is no reason they can't sell it. >> i'm frustrated with all of capitol hill. it is a lot of people to feel that way. it is disgraceful what's going on and we have to put some people who will compromise and of these guys can do it, get rid of them. >> even if the deal isn't found, it won't fix america's budget problems. the government has been tried and found wanting. >> let's take you back to the scene of the greek capital, athens. we did not do it much just as we came to at midnight but the fireworks are under way. it is a country in the deep crypts of austerity budget is perhaps the greeks for getting the financial woes of the country for a few hours. let's leave this beautiful scenes in aphids and go back to the continuing saga on capitol hill. steve kingston is following develops -- following developments. >> both sides are expressing cautious optimism
the fiscal cliff will have on the economy and have on consumers and potentially lead us back into as you mentioned what a lot of economists believe, another recession. gregg: what happens when fourth quarter earnings come out? >> nobody is really talking about this. companies, fourth quarter ends in a few days from now. we haven't had many warnings come from companies but when you see consumer confidence falling, mastercard came out with their numbers on holiday sales only increasing .7%. well below estimates and historical averages and consumer is 70% of the economy we'll see a wave of corporations come out earnings in middle of january, end of january, come out much lower than expectations. as senator corker talked about today, the markets have held up very well throughout this, because a lot of people on wall street including myself believed a deal would get done before the end of the year. that is looking less and less likely. if nothing gets done you will see the market tank, less consumer spending. gregg: if consumer spending is 70% of the american economy, and it is clearly, this
are going up. the economy is slow. we may or may not go over the fiscal cliff but regardless the economy is stalled and taxes are going up. there is certainty but not just great certainty. >> as a family-owned business after 91 years of being in business we know there's a business cycle. what we need to continue to advocate for as job creators is the virtue of free enterprise. we need to stand up for the principles that are going to allow u to provide our people employment and create prosperity and we have to be able to do that in a unified way because even though the forecast can look bleak at different times we have an incredibly resilient economy and great job creators out there who just given the chance will make a big difference. that is what we have to continue working on. melissa: but, jim, aren't you afraid of being punished either by the public or by the government for speaking out at this point? i mean i have talked privately to people on wall street who have said, you know, they feel like they get pistol-whipped when they say anything against the administration. that it comes
higher unemployment and probably effect of recession. >> the fiscal cliff is a series of spending cuts and tax rises. the uncertainty is already hurting the economy here and americans are angry. >> there is no reason they can't sell it. >> i'm frustrated with all of capitol hill. it is a lot of people to feel that way. it is disgraceful what's going on and we have to put some people who will compromise and of these guys can do it, get rid of them. >> even if the deal isn't found, it won't fix america's budget problems. the government has been tried and found wanting. >> let's take you back to the scene of the greek capital, athens. we did not do it much just as we came to at midnight but the fireworks are under way. it is a country in the deep crypts of austerity budget is perhaps the greeks for getting the financial woes of the country for a few hours. let's leave this beautiful scenes in aphids and go back to the continuing saga on capitol hill. steve kingston is following develops -- following developments. >> both sides are expressing cautious optimism that the framework appears to
, but the republicans win because the economy is going to go out yet another fiscal cliff. george w. bush is not the president. obama is the president, he is not putting forth proposals to work with republicans. he will have to take ownership of this. they need to come up with a cohesive message about real economic growth and shrinking the size of government. they don't have a message and that is going to be the big question about who wins and long-run. jon: if we go over the cliff, i mean, everyone's paycheck, just about -- come january 1, it will be shrunk because government is going to be taking a much bigger chunk out of it. that will infuriate people. are they going to be blaming president obama? >> well, they won't be blaming president obama because polls show that they are blaming republicans. republicans are not really coming to the table. we had an election, and we had an election where voters clearly supported the president. jon: he got 50.96% of the population. >> he got over 300 electoral votes. romney only have one battleground state. tons of senate victories, again in the ho
.s. economy going over the fiscal cliff. the president will meet with congressional leaders at the whiteout at about 3:00 p.m. eastern. speaker john boehner has called the house back into session sunday evening. house majority leader eric cantor is telling members to be prepared to work through january 2nd. both sides are still far apart on taxes and spending cuts. spending majority leader says harry reid says prospects for monday are unlikely. senate majority leader believes there is still time for an agreement to be reached. >> republicans aren't about to sign a blank just just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the american people. >> alistair newton joins us here as a new reuters poll shows americans blame republicans more than democrats or president obama for the fiscal crisis. 27% cited the gop is responsible. 16% blaming the president, 6% pointing to the democrats while 31% said they would blame all of the above for going over the cliff. alistair newton, you've seen the attitudes of the american people. i guess we're going over the cliff. >>
to reach a deal with poison u.s. consumer spending. the fiscal cliff would trigger tax increases and government spending cuts in january, leaving far less money in the economy. the international monetary fund warrants of knock on effects for the global economy. -- warns of knock on effects for the global economy. the pressure is on in washington to agree on a plan. only then might the applause on wall street be a little more genuine. >> with the clock ticking ever more loudly in washington, let's bring in our correspondent. first off, are the prospects of an agreement as dim as we are hearing, or could there be a last-minute deal? then of course this could happen, but i think it is quite unlikely. there is an increased pessimism that a deal can be achieved in washington, d.c. from my perspective, i think washington moves too slowly. tax rates will go for all americans, and cuts will go into effect by the end of this year, and we will see no more unemployment benefits for about 2 million americans. >> there are some technicalities here. what are the government's contingency plans?
of $100 billion last year. as the u.s. economy moves rapidly toward falling off the fiscal cliff, president obama is about to give a final push. negotiating with congressional leaders from both political parties. from the democrat-controlled senate, top democrat harry reid, and the top republican mitch mcconnell. senator reid says there is no time to reach a deal. mr. mcconnell says he is more optimistic. then from the republican controlled house of representatives, the top republican john boehner has rejected president obama's previous offers and the morse -- most senior democrat in the house, nancy pelosi. what is the cliff and can be avoided? >> the house of representatives will be going back into session sunday but at this point we do not know what kind of measure they have before them that they can consider for a vote. there has been no indication from the white house or the republican leadership that they are anywhere near any kind of makings of a deal that they could present to the house republican leadership -- or the house republican rank-and-file who so far have been ad
. the big worries about the fiscal cliff and how that's going to affect the economy as a whole. you look at oil prices and they have barely moved since late october. oil prices are between $85 to $90 a barrel since late october. and when oil prices stabilize for a longer time, as they have been, it gives gas prices a better chance to stabilize as well. but you look at it broadly, though, the gas prices are not falling for the the right reason. we could go back into a recession and it's those concerns for a downturn in the economy that are actually pushing prices lower. >> all right. alison kosik, live from the new york stock exchange. thank you as always. >>> the head of the national rifle association says to call him crazy for proposing more guns in schools. the nra's ceo wayne lapierre insists a ban on assault weapons won't prevent mass killings, which he blames on violent video games and the media. he says armed guns eed guards are the best way to prevent tragedies. >> if it's crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our school to protect our children, then call me craz
have a huge impact on our economy just when it's most vulnerable to the approaching fiscal cliff. business groups and state leaders are now calling on the president to intervene, warning that a strike could really cost the country billions of dollars. if history is any indication, those warnings may be dead on. a lockout on the west coast back in 2002, remember that? lasted a total of ten days, and it cost the economy an estimated $1 billion each and every day. >>> a strike at the ports of los angeles and long beach earlier this month lasted eight days, an estimated loss of $650 million a day. a republican strategist and a former campaign aide for president george w. bush, julie roginsky is former political adviser to new jersey senate frank lautenberg. good to see you both. >> good to see you. gregg: didi, smoot-holly was passed decades ago for the purpose of putting tariff limits on incoming products. do we need to reexplore that? >> yeah. this was, this was back in the '60s. i mean, this was ancient history. why should these workers who get paid very well also get on top of th
on everyone immediately. if washington can't come to a deal on the fiscal cliff. >> you have less money in a difficult economy with little clarity. >> the economy will go down sharply. >> look at the number from the tax policy center. this is the average tax hit the families take on top of what they pay on taxes. those make between $40,000 and $50,000 pay extra $1700. >> if you manage to make over $200,000, it will be a big jump up. you will need to send a check to uncle sam for $14,000 initial dollars. $500,000 to $1 million pays $34,000 more. they want $215,000 on top of what you pay in taxes. >> the wealth manager says the money you have left as far as businesses also deal with their own tax hikes. >> you are going to see less money in your paycheck. >> the government has to bite the bullet with $1.2 trillion in spending cuts. more than half of that is to the defense budget. >> they say families may need austerity calculation before making big purchases. look at the money you have and the money you need in the future to decide if you need the next big picture. doug? >> doug: thank yo
to reach an agreement or the u.s. economy will go off the so- called "fiscal cliff." that's when automatic spending increases and cuts would take effect. reaching a deal won't be easy because both sides are involved in a high stakes political blame game. >> we are here in washington working while the members of the house of representatives are out watching movies and watching the kids play soccer and basketball and doing all kinds of things. they should be here. >> i told the president we would be happy to look at wah he proposes but the truth is we are coming up against a hard deadline and as i said this is a conversation we should have had months ago. >> reporter: democrats want to extend the bush-era tax cuts to everyone except those americans making $250,000 or more a year. many republicans are against any tax increases. most americans just want something to be done. >> people are just tired of partisanship and they want everyone to come together. >> reporter: if lawmakers don't reach a deal by january 1, many economists are concerned it could eventually lead to another recession. i'm
. that is being discussed as part of a fiscal cliff deal but money believe that will hurt the economy and giving a disincentive to invest money. is that just focused on the real wealthy? >> i hear that argument a lot. number one, i'm really tired of our tax policy decisions and everything being made by what the market is going to do in the next quarter. look, this is an aberration and the tax code and grossly unfair. you look at say they raise tax rates, the top tax rate to 39.6% for those making more than $500,000, that's going to mean a lot of small businesses are going to pay that nearly 40% marginal tax rate where you have billionaire private equity funds paying 15, 20 or even 24 depending on where they put it. not an issue of penalizing investment income but penalizing labor and those who make their income through wages and they should both be taxed at the same rate. i do, again, fundam and at least raising the capital gains rate would help address this anomaly and susan collins and clara mccasical give legitimate -- you have billionaire equity managers paying 39%. i think this is a source
budget deficit. >> the japanese fiscal cliff will be larger than the one in the united states, because japan's financial burden is considerably heavier than the other developed nations. in order for japan to put its fiscal house in order to, japan is launching a tax hike soon. there's one important condition for japan to do that. that is to observe stable growth by the time the taxes will be raised. this government, it has to be eager to boost its economy so that you can see an uptick of growth in the first half of next year. >> toyota is having its largest ever safety crisis, but it will cost more than a billion dollars. japanese automakers selling with customers in the u.s. will say that their vehicle suddenly exploded for no reason. about 16 million vehicles were sold between 1998 and 2010. investors are relieved the payout was not even bigger. shares ended the day a little in tokyo. -- up a little. israeli-arab politician is appealing to the supreme court after she was barrestole the american dream, thursday, 30 eastern, 7:00 p.m. pacific. >> welcome back. a reminder of our top sto
conversations we'll have a bipartisan solution, because nobody wants to go over this fiscal cliff. it will damage our economy. it will hurt every taxpayer, the largest tax increase in history. it will affect everybody, and anyone who is watching who thinks, oh this isn't going to impact me, you will fin out d o will, and we know the problem is a lot of spending. not that we're not taxing people more, we're just spending too much. we hope that the president understands that as for as republicans are concerned, we're willing to negotiate and have a civil conversation, but also he's got to bring in some spending cuts and tax reform, because americans want tax reform and we don't want to hurt the economy, and, look there, are not enough millionaires in the united states to tax them all to be able to spend our way out of this problem. so let's -- let's give up a little bit -- each side can concede a little. and i think we can fin middle ground. i'm optimistic. >> we had your colleague nan hayworth last hour. she was expecting work to be done in the senate. the house did its best, boehn
to avoid the fiscal cliff. >> if in fact we do go over the fiscal cliff it means the economy is going to go down pretty sharply. [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit . gregg: you expect accrued of lines when you're shopping. how about sharks? look at those cameras rolling. a giant aquarium bursts, e phroedz insid explodes inside a mall in sang high china it sends glass, water, everywhere, including sharks. fortunately the sharks weren't terribly hungry at the moment and they didn't get very far. patti ann: george h.w. bush is in intensive care at a houston hospital battling a subject born fever. the former president has been sick for a few weeks now. on november 7th he was admitted to methodist hospital in houston what cough. he was later released only to be readmitted on november 23rd. by december 13th a hospital spokesman said the former president was improving and should
: well, we're still trying that last ditch effort to keep the economy from going over the fiscal cliff. lawmakers are heading back to washington including the president with this year-end deadline that's been on the horizon. welcome, everybody, great to have you here. brand new hour of "happening now." kelly: i'm kelly wright in for jon scott -- jamie: and i'm jamie colby in for jenna today. kelly: talks hitting a dead end last week, now most americans are facing big tax hikes unless the two sides can work out a last minute deal. chief white house correspondent ed henry with more. >> reporter: you're right, really all eyes turning to plan c. plan a was that $4 trillion debt deal, plan b was speaker boehner's idea about tax increases only for million dollar incomes and more, now turning to plan c which is president obama's idea which is to move it back to $250,000 or more, that would be the threshold for tax cuts or tax increases in the other direction, also dealing with two million people who are losing their unemployment benefits, president wants to the take care of that by the end of
up is only one part of this so-called fiscal cliff. what we also have facing us starting tomorrow or automatic spending cuts that are scheduled to go into effect. keep in mind that some of these spending cuts that congress has said will automatically go into effect have an impact on our defense department but that also have an impact on things like head start. there are some programs that are scheduled to be cut. we are using an ax instead of a scalpel. it may not always be the smartest cuts. that is a piece of business that still has to be taken care of. i want to make clear that any agreement we have to deal with these automatic spending cuts, those also have to be balanced. my principle has always been to do things in a balanced, responsible way and that means revenues as to be part of the equation in turning off the sequestered. as well as spending cuts. my principle has alwaysthe samee deficit agreement. we will have to do more to reduce our debt and deficit. i am willing to do more but it will have to be balanced. we will have to do it in a responsible way. i am willing to r
is the fiscal cliff impasse. it's a potentially devastating one-two bunch for the u.s. economy. neither the longshore's union or alliance shipping company would allow anyone to speak on camera. but officials knowledgeable of the negotiations say it boils down to one issue. the key sticking point is the payments that the longshore men get for them. they pay royalties for the containers based on their weight but the shipping companies want to freeze those royalty payments for current longshore men and eliminate them for future hires. the longshore men say the royalties are made to make up for automation. but if the shipping companies lockout the longshore men -- >> that would impact more than containers. that would impact all cargos at ports. that would have a much more impactful reaction. $55 billion worth of cargo in an average month this year. candy? >> brian, i have to imagine retail companies and others who want those goods off the ships and in their stores have to be plenty worried. do they have a plan b to move those goods if there's a strike? >> reporter: yes. some of them do. clo
: maria mow lean a thanks. gregg: the fiscal cliff is not the only threat facing the u.s. economy right now. shipments of all kinds could actually be stuck on cargo ships if a longshoreman strike goes ahead as planned. the stakes for the recovery coming up. patti ann: high noon in those fiscal cliff negotiations. >> nothing have move forward in regards to our budget crisis unless speaker boehner and mitch mcconnell will go forward with our plan. speaker boehner is willing to negotiate, we have not heard a word from mitch mcconnell, and nothing is hang. patti ann: chris vanhollen joins us next. pwhrafp [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i just finished a bowl of your new light chicken pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... ...lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i can still see you. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. . patti ann: fox news alert, potentially good news for the nation's housing market. pending home sales, which measure homes that are in contract and about to be sold rose 1.7% in novemb
on wall street and talks staaled on the fiscal cliff. the dow dropped nearly 121 points on friday while the nasdaq fell 29. >>> as the americans hit the road for holiday travel, they'll be paying less at the gas pump. according to aaa, the national average is about 3.25 cents for regular. that's town 16 cents from a month ago. >>> "the hobbit:an unexpected journey." took in $27 million. duarte? >> thank you, erica ferrari, here in new york. >>> in sports the seahawks put a damper on the 49ers' plan of winning the midwest. they have a field goal block. it's scooped up by the seahawks richard sherman who brings it back for a touchdown. blows out san fran, 42-13. >>> and the baltimore ravens are the champions of the afc north. the ravens get on the board first with a touchdown grab by torey. win. ass the giants for a 33-14 when we return, the holiday hit a high note. audiences around the world take part at an annual sing-a-long. ♪ oh, it's great! now i can brew my coffee just the way i love it. how do you do that? well, inside the brewer, there's this train that's powerful enough to carr
to say yes, the fiscal cliff would be averted, we'd have a good christmas and happy economic fun times for the economy would be right around the corner. they were wrong. >> we are nowhere when it comes to the fiscal cliff talks. let me tell you what's going to happen today. speaker john boehner, the republican speaker, is going to try to pass what he calls his plan b, which would just simply address tax rates for those making a million dollars or more and that's it. >> john boehner walked away from the obama administration's third offer. a giant, giant compromise. so he didn't like it when they led. he didn't like the decision. he decided instead to chart his own course called plan b. plan b was supposed to show president obama that republicans had their own solution and instead of bothering with his offer they would just go ahead and pass their own plan without him. that was the idea, anyway. >> there is breaking news to report tonight out of washington. strange breaking news out of washington. within the last hour republican house speaker john boehner appears to have completely lost
was closed. stocks stumbled on wall street and talks stalled on the fiscal cliff. the dow dropped nearly 121 points on friday while the nasdaq fell 29. >>> as americans hit the road for holiday travel they'll be paying let at the gas pump. according to aaa, the national average is about 3.25 cents a gallon for regular. that's down 16 cents from a month ago. >>> "the hobbit:an unexpected journey," took in $27 million. coming in second $16 million. "this is it" took in $14 million. duarte? >> thank you, erica ferrari, here in new york. >>> in sports the seahawks put a damper on the 49ers' plan of winning the midwest. they have a field goal block. it's scooped up by the seahawks richard sherman who brings it back to 90 yards for a touchdown. seattle blows out san fran 42-13. >>> and the baltimore ravens are the champions of the afc north. the ravens get on the board first with a touchdown grab by tore are smith. baltimore passes the giants for a 33-14 win. when we return, the holiday hit a high note. audiences around the world take part at an annual sing-a-long of a cl
the fiscal cliff, the fiasco as well as the debt ceiling debacle. richard, how is this playing out? we understand richard is not here. we're going to talk to richard a little later about this. >>> eurovision, a singing competition, a lot like "american idol." it's popular, trendy, everybody's watching it. it launched the careers of abba and celine dion. now the radio show which is paid for by the countries that participate in it, it's now in trouble. the economy is to blame. here's our reporter. ♪ >> reporter: cheesy music. kitsch costumes. ♪ and national stereotypes. ♪ for 58 years, the eurovision song contest has united europeans in a celebration of music and at times laughter. ♪ but as countries struggle to meet budget targets, frills are starting to take a back seat. portugal, poland, slovakia and boz that herzegovina say they're pulling out of the competition because they can't afford to win. the czech republic and greece are also reported to want out. >> it costs to perform, and it costs to stage it. and what do you get back? bluntly a bunch of hoopla and a few pom-poms.
.s. stock market. despite all those worries about the fiscal cliff and maybe slower growth in the u.s. economy, the stock market has had a great year. too bad you missed out. the smart money's been in the market. the rest of us have been worried about the fiscal cliff. >> number eight, facebook's ipo. hundreds of millions of people like facebook but investors did not on its first day as a public company. trading glitches at the nasdaq and questions about the company's ability to make money on mobile users pummeled the stock which has yet to climb its way back to its ipo price. >> number seven, mother meyer, the new ceo of yahoo!. 37 years old. looks like a mother's touch is just exactly what yahoo! needed. >> number six, mother nature. an intense drought in the midwest that scorched the soy and corn crop sending prices sky high. who could forget superstorm sandy. neighborhoods swept away, millions without power and damages as high as $50 billion, raising lots of questions about u.s. infrastructure and whether we should be spending some money to fix it. >> number five, china. is chin
. you're in "the situation room." the u.s. is now just six days away from the so-called fiscal cliff. and a mad scramble is on here in washington to avoid the drastic tax hikes and spending cuts that many fear will plunge the economy back into recession. president obama flies back from hawaii tonight to be ready if the senate comes back with a plan when it returns to work tomorrow. and house leaders are huddling with members on stand-by to return. senior congressional correspondent dana bash is following all of it for us. what are you hearing? >> there was a conference call of course members of the house leadership even, they're back in their districts, but there was a conference call today among those house republican leaders trying to figure out if and when the house should come back into session. two republican sources tell me they did not make a decision on this call. it's still up in the air. and a big reason for that is if anything can get done in the next six days, the ball is in the senate's court. the capitol is a ghost town. neither chamber in session. an eerie calm since t
with an economy that is struggling possibly even a one-two punch with a fiscal cliff and strike. all this could return 30 days from now. >> indeed. phil, thank %ou. obesity rates in america have been growing quickly and steadily for decades. but finally a sliver of good news about the country's health. the new numbers on your children are next. [ mother ] you can't leave the table till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! >>> a potential bright spot is in the battle against childhood obesity. obese rates among young children in low income homes dipped. the rate began dropping 8 or 9 years ago and by 2010 fell below 15%. while the drop was comparatively small, researchers say it's the first study to show it may be on the decline after tripling the last 30 years. with us, doctor kerry peterson. doctor, good to see you. are you encouraged? >> i am. even though it's modest, we're taking a turn in the right direction. it was a large study, loo
? the fiscal cliff, still looming. spending cuts and tax hikes that could shove our economy into recession. and a deadline lawmakers ignored until the very last possible minute. live pictures now of the capitol. looks beautiful. man, but there's a lot of wrangling going on there. lawmakers are back up -- had their backs up against the wall right now. and as they try to find a plan that can pass congress. let's hope they do. cnn's chief white house correspondent is jessica yellin. she is following the negotiations, working very hard on this saturday. so jess, democrats and republicans are supposedly working on a plan, even as we speak. what do we know about it? >> reporter: well, we know, don, that it's the senate leaders that are hashing this out. and what they're looking to negotiate is a deal that would extend current low tax rates for middle income americans. we don't know the exact threshold levels. so would it be people who make $400,000 and less, would it be $250,000 and less. but something that would extend low rates and then increase them above. extend probably unemployment benefit
are great, so died in. >> the overall economy is doing quite well except we have the fiscal cliff issue. if you look at the employment situation that has stabilized and showing an improvement, you look at what is going on in the united states as far as manufacturing is concerned, housing prices have done well, housing sales of the unwelcome consumers, they still want to spend the being put off by this issue. lori: what sectors of i jump into? >> it will be extremely difficult but what you want to do is concentrate on things like financials, they will see a major rebound once we get some compromise. you will look at energy because we will look at consumer discretion and have exposure to the technology sector. lori: what is the mistake investors are making in the midst of this? >> getting wrapped up with this noise. a deal will come down but if you wait for the bottom to come, a market breaking apart, all hell breaking loose you will miss out because you'll be sitting on the sidelines. do some buying as the market pulls back and don't worry about catching a falling knife. tracy: don't fig
. >> coming at the same time as the fiscal cliff impasse it's a potentially devastating one-two punch for the u.s. economy. neither the longshoreman's union nor the northern alliance would give us anyone to speak on camera but officials with knowledge of the negotiations say it boils down to one issue -- the key sticking point is over those large containers and the payments that longshoremen get for them. the shipping companies pay royalties to the longshoremen for the containers based on their weight but the shipping companies want to freeze the royalty payments for current longshoremen and eliminate them completely for future hires. the longshoremen say the royalties are designed to make up for jobs lost to automation. strike would only affect ports that handle containers, not other cargo like automobiles, but if the shipping companies lock out the longshoreman -- >> that would impact more than containers. that would impact all cargos at ports, so that would have obviously a much more impactful reaction. >> reporter: how impactful? scher says east coast and gulf coast ports handled
. with the deadline of the fiscal cliff only hours away. we failed to reach a reasonable compromise to move the economy forward and ward off painful tax hikes on the middle class. >> a lot of people feeling like in both the house and the senate this process could have been handled much better a long time ago with open hearings rather than having two people negotiate this deal at the last minute, trace. mike emanuel back to us on capitol hill. any updates as they come in. thank you. on this day in 1938, police tested the world's first
of the fiscal cliff, we may go through this all over again. it's another drag on the markets and on the whole economy at exactly the wrong time. >> when you say drag, though, give us an example of what you mean. we talked about january 2nd, everybody goes back to work and markets open. are we going to see a lot of volatility. all of a sudden it crashes down at once. what happens to wall street. >> we're going to see a lot of volume activity until the issues get resolved. it's not as if the borrowing limit directly affects companies represented in the stock market, but the problem is that washington is the whole story right now and there's so much unpredictability about the economy. u.s. treasury securities are the biggest class of securities in the world. it sort of affects everything else about the markets, the financial markets, interest rates. and if we don't quite know what's going to happen in that bedrock market, which provides a lot of liquidity, it affects everything else. there's also a psychological component, which standard & poor's hinted at. the fact there's so little confidence
force one early this morning and headed for washington to deal with unfinished fiscal cliff business. with just five days until the combination of automatic tax increases and spending cuts that could send the economy back into recession, mr. obama wants congress to take the lead in getting the job done. the senate convenes later today and senate majority leader harry reid told members to be prepared to address fiscal cliff issues through the weekend. reid is working on his own plan to get lawmakers to come together before the end of the year deadline. that plan would likely include letting the bush tax cuts expire for households making more than $250,000 a year and short term spending cuts instead of the massive long-term cuts that would happen if there is no deal. after our wednesday conference call, house republican leaders issued a statement saying they were waiting for the democratic controlled senate. the house will take this action on whatever the senate can pass they said but the senate first must act. in a sign of public frustration over the lack of a de
of a fiscal cliff deal, but many believe that will end up hurting the economy, giving a disincentive to invest money? was that just focused on the real wealthy? >> i hear that argument a lot. number one is, i'm really tired of our tax policy decisions. you know, everything, being made by what the market's going to do in the next quarter. this is about aberration of the tax code and grossly unfair. say they raise top tax rate to 39.6% for those making more than $500,000. that means a lot of small businesses will are paying that nearly 40% marginal tax rate where you have billionaire private equity funds paying 15, 20, even 24, depending where they put it. it's not an issue of penalizing investment income. it's an issue of penalizing labor, and those who make their income through wages. both are legitimate and both should be taxed at the same rate. so i do -- again, fundamental tax reform could solve this problem, but at least raising the capital gains rate would help address this anomaly and susan collins and claire mccaskill have a proposal to try to give small business owners, legitimate smal
forward and pass whenever bill is necessary so we can avoid this fiscal cliff. if we do not do that, it will result in the economy, a tepid recovery we are having to go into recession. we do not want that. host: thank you for the call, justin. a few comments on our facebook page -- we are taking your calls and tweets and facebook messages all morning on this segment and the next segment about the fiscal cliff. we will go to franklin from georgia on the democratic line. good morning. caller: good morning. i like to tell congress, congress is a mano kolinsky for the lobbyists. we have to deal with that. -- monica lewinsky for the lobbyists. we have to do that. they are putting money in their pockets so they can take vacations and revitalize their homes. host: do you think this fiscal cliff nonsense is to make more members of congress money. caller: yes. anytime you can say that corporations are people, you have already gone against -- i am talking about what the forefathers said. when they said that liberty and pursuit of happiness -- the two- party does not -- the tea party does not
cliff we know it will take some dollars out of the economy, whether it is higher taxes or entitlement cuts. it will create a little bit of a shock to the economy but there are bright spots we should look for in 2013. harris: there are three you said. what are they? >> housing, energy and huge amount, trillions of dollars sitting on the sidelines by corporate america, waiting to come into the economy once this picture clears up. harris: we're getting housing numbers coming this week already. we're starting to see prices rose a little bit this fall. that is a good sign. we're seeing housing starts have come up as well. so i understand that. energy. >> energy is a game-changer, it really is. we look what is going on around the world. the europeans, far east, they're paying over $17 a btu for natural gas. we get it for $3 in this country. dow chemical just proposed building the largest chemical plant it has in the world here in this country because of the competitive advantage of natural gas. imagine if we could liquify, ship it to europe, ship it to the far east. not only would we have a
also referenced the impending fiscal cliff, which threatens to derail the economy if a compromise can't be reached by next week on those big unanswered issues. with both sides locked in the standoff, house republicans are calling on senate democrats to act first. democrats aren't budging much on their demands. they want to extend tax cuts and incomes below $250,000, prolong unemployment benefits, and delay those sweeping spending cuts. sam stein. >> yes. >> what happens in -- and it appears it will happen -- we go off the fiscal cliff for a few days? >> not much, is my understanding. kwb, over time, it will have much more of an impact, and it's unknown exactly what the market's psyche will do with respect to the government's inability to come together. with respect to the tax hikes, it won't be as bad as the rhetoric is suggesting early on. whether it's enough to actually get people to get back to the negotiating table -- because i agree with you, i think we're going to go over that deadline, that's the big question. what kind of political ramifications it will have. it's not as if yo
at the countdown to the fiscal cliff. our guest will be damian paletta. then an interview with randallotoole. then a discussion on the economy, poverty, and hunger. an urban's snr fellow. "washington journal" live every morning on c-span. >> california's representative lynn woolsey is retiring this year. she represents the 6th district in california. we spoke with her in november about her time as co-chairman of the progressive caucus as well as her opposition to the iraq and afghanistan wars. this interview is 30 minutes. >> representative lynn woolsey retiring, 20 years in congress. why are you leaving? >> well, i had my --ly say it this way, i was elected 20 years ago on my 55th birthday. do the math and 20 years and 75 years old and it is time for me to retire. >> what is next? >> i'm president for americans for democratic action. i was just re-elected for a second term. i follow in the footsteps of george mcgovernor and others and i will have a national presence and i will be traveling around the world to developing countries with the organization. >> what are you going to be doing with
, corporations. i'm happy to be here today to talk to you about the fiscal cliff and how it might affect my business. i am mostly optimistic about our economy in the future, i have grave concerns about what is going on in congress and the potential fiscal cliff we are facing and the elimination of the tax cuts. a lot of the small business owners i talked to and know are in favor of keeping the tax cuts in place especially for the middle class. we believe in balanced approach and we think it's ok to allow the elimination of the tax cuts for the wealthy. as taxes increase, the taxes at my business will be effected and i will have less to pay for investments and new equipment, hiring new people, but personally my income tax rates will go up. it's already a financially constrained environment. but customers tax rates will go up creating less demand for my products and less revenue for me and less tax revenue for the government. i want to urge congress and senators to vote for keeping our tax cuts in place, especially for the middle class and pushing our fiscal crisis to a balanced approach. go
motive. >> terrible story. a week before the fiscal cliff, tax hikes for all americans and spending cuts that could pull the economy back into recession. ho, ho, ho. that makes everybody happy on christmas morning. president obama spent christmas eve playing a round of golf with friends and the democratic senate looks like the only hope for crushing the deadlock. our white house correspondent brianna keilar maybe with a little bit of news which is pathetic because it's talks within the democratic party, but at least they are talking. >> reporter: that's right. is it really news that democrats are talking? that's all the news we have to report as of today. i know i feel a little bit like a grinch reporting this, but the white house is in talks with senate democrats. that's not really surprising as we look to the senate to be the next -- really the next ones to act on this when they reconvene on the 27th. right now it's really up to senate majority leader harry reid to try to cobble something together that can get some republican support in the senate and the house to avoid the fiscal clif
: as lawmakers struggled with the fiscal cliff, treasury secretary timothy geithner is facing an equally harrowing deadline is the u.s. economy approaches its borrowing limit of $16.4 trillion. he says that he is being forced to use extraordinary measures. just to try try to keep things afloat for another few months. do you ever feel like groundhog day? paul harrington is a managing partner of harrington financial llc. i do feel like bill murray in his movie "groundhog day", the movie. it seems to be happening over and over again, doesn't it? [laughter] reporter: this narrative is tiring and frustrating. we have been talking about this every year. we do have a $16.4 trillion debt ceiling. i want people to realize that there are vibrational effects associated with going over or trying to extend the debt ceiling. one example is the credit rating of the united states. we already saw a downgrade their with our respective credit rating in the united states. if we are going to go through the debt ceiling once again, and i suspect that we will revisit having another downgrade to her credit rati
. this could have a very, very bad impact on the economy as a whole. it is called the fiscal cliff. for that reason. a plan to stop it all from happening still eludes washington. so congress has broken camp for the holidays, the president has gone to hawaii on vacation. white house correspondent brianna keilar tells us no one is really talking, anyone, to get this solved. at least not here at christmas. >> reporter: senate democrats are not in conversations right now with senate republicans or with house republicans. and this is problematic obviously because in order to avoid the fiscal cliff, you would need to find some sort of deal that would make it through the senate and the house and that would mean democratic and republican support. right now, all eyes on the senate because they will reconvene on the 27th that is thursday. and senate majority leader harry reid, it is up to him really to cobble together something that can get some of that support. right now the white house is still supporting a threshold of $250,000 back to their initial starting point for tax rates going up f
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